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Archive for the ‘Video’ Category

“People are generating a profit by doing good in their communities” – Kerryn Krige on The Disruptors (Video)

The DisruptorsThe Disruptors: Social Entrepreneurs Reinventing Business and Society by Kerryn Krige and Gus Silber tells the story of how social entrepreneurs are imagining a better way to a better world.

GIBS Business School has shared a video of the launch of The Disruptors on their YouTube channel in which Krige explains why she is so excited by this important study. The launch took place at the University of Johannesburg earlier this year.

“For the first time, we really have a full profile of what modern-day social entrepreneurship looks like in South Africa and the real breadth of activity that is happening in this space,” Krige says. “So, people are generating a profit by doing good in their communities.”

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How “super-entrepreneurs” will shape our economic future – The Disruptors author Kerryn Krige explains

The DisruptorsKerryn Krige chatted to SABC News recently about her new book, The Disruptors: Social Entrepreneurs Reinventing Business and Society.

The Disruptors, co-written by Krige and Gus Silber, focuses on a new breed of social entrepreneurs – who Krige calls “super-entrepreneurs” – who are striving to build and grow enterprises that fight social ills, foster opportunity, and help to improve society.

South Africa’s unemployment rate is at an eight year high – a situation that calls for innovative solutions. “As our economy gets more difficult for business to thrive in,” Krige says, “I do believe it’s our social entrepreneurs who hold the secret key to how entrepreneurship can thrive in South Africa.”

Krige is a specialist in social and environmental enterprise and heads up the Network for Social Entrepreneurs at Gordon Institute for Business Science.

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Mbilwi Secondary School excels again – Redi Tlhabi speaks to top matriculant and principal to find out how

How to Fix South Africa's SchoolsMbilwi Secondary School in Limpopo – one of the remarkable schools featured in Jonathan Jansen and Molly Blank’s book How to Fix South Africa’s Schools: Lessons from Schools that Work – has excelled once again.

Talk Radio 702′s Redi Tlhabi spoke to Hamandishe Mathivha, top 2015 Mbilwi matric pupil, and Cedric Lidzhade, principal of the school, to hear how they overcome various obstacles like overcrowded classrooms and poor infrastructure to produce some of the country’s best science students.

Mathivha got 100 percent in Mathematics, Physical Science and Geography in his final matric exams. He says it was easy, because he loves the subjects so much:

From a really young age I’ve been curious about mathematical concepts and scientific facts; it’s just my passion and I’m really curious about the world. I want to know stuff, and that curiosity really developed a passion in me and a love for science and mathematics.

I think that it’s really important to, as a student, love the subjects you do because then it’s never really work. Then, it’s not like when you are studying you are working. You’re playing; it’s your hobby, your thing.

The young man ascribes his joy in these subjects to his dedicated teachers who remain motivated and sacrificial in their approach to education. Principal Lidzhade, a past pupil of the school, says that he expects his teachers to be energised and eager; to give education their all. They focus on the younger learners to build strong foundations, which makes it easier for senior students to excel.

When asked how they get pupils to enjoy science and maths so much, Lidzhade stresses that they do not treat these subjects like punishments. They impart excitement about knowledge and the discovery of facts and hope that the kids will catch on.

Listen to the inspiring podcast to find out how Mbilwi Secondary School succeeds despite strenuous circumstances:

Watch a short film about Mbilwi Secondary School, created as part of the project that lead to How to Fix South Africa’s Schools:

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Succeeding against the Odds: Twin Brothers from Khayelitsha Graduate as Doctors (Video)

How to Fix South Africa's SchoolsWandile and Wanele Ganya, twins from Khayelitsha’s J-Section, have beaten the odds to graduate with Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery degrees from Stellenbosch University.

Wandile and Wanele matriculated in 2009 from the Centre of Science and Technology (COSAT) in Khayelitsha, one of the schools featured in How to Fix South Africa’s Schools: Lessons from Schools that Work by Jonathan Jansen and Molly Blank.

Ilse Fredericks writes for the Cape Argus that during their matric year, Wanele contracted tuberculosis and Wandile took care of him, making sure he didn’t fall behind in his schoolwork. On top of helping his brother, Wandile was also one of the top achievers in the Western Cape senior certificate exam. The experience inspired the twins to study medicine.

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Wandile and Wanele Ganya, 23, grew up in Khayelitsha’s J-Section, and the family relied on the wages of their mother, Sylvia, a domestic worker.

During their matric year at the Centre of Science and Technology in Khayelitsha, Wanele contracted tuberculosis and Wandile helped to take care of him and ensured that he didn’t miss out on any school work.

“I think that is part of the reason why we became doctors, but we also saw so many people from our community and our school doing extraordinary things and that inspired us,” said Wanele.

Wandile was one of the Western Cape’s top matriculants in 2009.

He said financial and other support the pair had received from Stellenbosch University had helped “immensely”.

Both have been recipients of the Rector’s Award for Succeeding Against the Odds.

The Centre of Science and Technology was established in 1999 to strengthen the quality of Maths and Science education in townships in the Western Cape.

With impressive results and a strong reputation, it’s no wonder COSAT is one of the institutions Jansen and Blank chose for their study on schools that work.

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“Training Gives You Skills; Education Makes You a Human Being” – Jonathan Jansen (Video)

We Need to ActHow to Fix South Africa's SchoolsJonathan Jansen was recently invited to Story Sessions, an initiative founded by Travis Gale and sponsored by Appletree Catalyst Agency and FMI that aims to share inspirational stories that will change your world.

Brad Toerien, the CEO of FMI, said in his introduction to Jansen’s speech that the University of the Free State vice-chancellor and rector has always been his hero. Gale added: “He’s a man who’s authentically used love to transition a community.”

The author of How to Fix South Africa’s Schools: Lessons from Schools that Work and We Need to Act shared his life story and his view on the future of our country.

Jansen shared anecdotes from his childhood in Port Elizabeth, saying that “Sterimilk and Maltabella is better than sex”. He also spoke about the teacher who changed his entire perspective on life when he told him, “You pretend you know nothing but actually you’re very smart.”

Jansen reflected on his first year at university, when lecturers often told students that they weren’t going to make it before they could even try, and the demoralising effect such statements have on young people: “We make, in a nutshell, a big mistake in South Africa – we confuse training with education. Training gives you skills; education makes you a human being.”

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Video: Counselling Psychologist Samantha Pretorius’ Advice for Matriculants Asking “What Next?”

Your First Year of WorkThe final grade 12 exams have just come to an end and hundreds of matriculants around the country are facing difficult decisions about life after high school.

Counselling psychologist Samantha Pretorius was recently featured on the Expresso Show to share her wisdom about tackling the big “What next?” question.

Pretorius says “it’s incredibly daunting” but young people can handle the period of making choices well if they look to make “the best informed decision” by gathering information about their own interests, abilities and values.

“I hate that term ‘the wrong choice’,” Pretorius says, because every choice will yield “learning and insight”. Less than perfect decisions are just little curves on the road to one’s desired destination.

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Equip the matriculants in your life to make good and wise decisions by buying them a copy of Your First Year of Work: The Survival Guide by Shelagh Foster.

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“You Can’t Focus on Reconciliation Without Focussing on Social Justice” – Jonathan Jansen (Video)

We Need to ActHow to Fix South Africa's SchoolsJonathan Jansen’s name has become synonymous with reconciliation because of efforts at the University of the Free State where he is vice-chancellor and rector.

Morning Live’s Ayanda-Allie Paine spoke to him at the launch of Reconciliation Month, which is celebrated in December, about the importance of reconciliation, race relations in South Africa and his hopes for the future of the country. He says one way in which the country can be truly reconciled is if South Africans can truly embrace one another’s memories, the good and the bad “and to try to figure out how we together, having been entangled in the past, can work together to solve the pressing problems of the present, whether it’s education or drought or problems of corruption”.

Jansen also talks about the “dream of 1994″ and the notion that the democratically elected government only put a band-aid over a gaping wound. He says it’s easy to say that now, as people have selective memories, and calls for people to realise that the only way forward for the country is to move together. “I’m very optimistic,” he says about the future of the country and reconciliation. He points out, however: “You can’t focus on reconciliation without focussing on social justice.”

Jansen is the author of We Need to Act and co-author of How to Fix South Africa’s Schools: Lessons from Schools that Work.

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“I Understand that I may be Seeing You Soon”: Watch Al-Qaeda Hostage Stephen McGown’s Hopeful Video

Imtiaz Sooliman and the Gift of the GiversEarlier this week a video of Stephen McGown was released by his captors.

McGown was captured 4 years ago while visiting Mali, and has since been held captive by al-Qaeda. The video shows that he is alive and healthy, and hopeful that he will be released soon.

In the video, McGown thanks the South African government for its continued efforts to negotiate his release and also gives thanks to Gift of the Givers for their involvement. He says: “I hope you are all well back home. I understand that I may be seeing you soon. I believe that there is an organisation involved now, a South African organisation, brokering the release”.

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Following the release of the hostage video, eNCA interviewed Malcolm McGown, Stephen’s father. McGown senior says he is in constant contact with Imtiaz Sooliman, founder and head of Gift of the Givers, who has kept him updated on the hostage negotiation. The organisation’s work is cause for great hope for the family.

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“Let Us Treat All 60 million South Africans as Equal Citizens of this Country” – Herman Mashaba (Podcast)

Capitalist CrusaderHerman Mashaba, entrepreneurial businessman, was recently interviewed about his new book Capitalist Crusader: Fighting Poverty Through Economic Growth by Shannon de Ryhove for Polity as well as by Shafiq Morton on his Voice of the Cape radio show.

Mashaba spoke to De Ryhove about why South Africa should embrace a free market economy instead of the democratic values of economic freedom. He says “as a country, we don’t just want to live, we want to be successful. And success comes from economic growth, and economic growth can only be driven through free market.”

Governments need to act as “refereea”, Mashaba says, because the rule of law and personal safety is important for an effective free market. But apart from this, governments should leave the capitalist system alone for optimum economic growth.

Mashaba explains why he regards the capitalist system of free individuals as the most “natural system”, and links this with his vision for the economy in South Africa.

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In his discussion with Morton, Mashaba speaks about why he decided to write Capitalist Crusader, and says he had three important motivations. First, he wanted to encourage civil society action, because he regards this as essential if South Africa is to “really get democracy to work and succeed”. Second, Mashaba hopes to persuade South Africans to “embrace the free market system” because government, in his view, does not create economic growth. Finally he wants to say: “South Africa, let us do away with all race-based discrimination – let us arrange to treat all 60 million South Africans as equal citizens of this country.”

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3 Questions Your Children Must Ask Themselves before Posting Anything Online – Nikki Bush (Video)

Tech-Savvy ParentingNikki Bush, parenting expert and author of Tech-Savvy Parenting: A Guide to Raising Safe Children in a Digital World, was recently featured on the Expresso Show to speak about the risks and potential for children when they interact online.

Bush discusses cyber-bullying, YouTube stars and what parents need to do to steer their children in the right direction, with presenter Ewan Strydom. She says it is most important “to teach children to make the best possible choices they can online. They need to understand that everything that they’re doing is a choice”.

Bush lists three questions children should be taught to ask about every action online, whether posting content or simply responding to others’ posts. Children need to consider: “Is this good for me?” “Is this good for the person I’m talking about?” and “Is it good for my reputation?”

Finally, Bush emphasises the importance of valuable connections in teaching children that people are more important than what happens online.

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