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Archive for the ‘News’ Category

“Can racism and intimacy co-exist in post-apartheid South Africa?” asks Jonathan Jansen in Making Love in a War Zone

‘My father-in-law did not show up for the wedding. My future wife had to leave her family home the moment we asked permission to ‘go out’ together, a tradition in those days. There were certain members of the family whom she visited on her own; my presence was not welcomed. I was a confident human being and a proud black man, but those things stick when it comes to flesh and blood.’

– Jonathan Jansen

Making Love in a War Zone

Can racism and intimacy co-exist? Can love and friendship form and flourish across South Africa’s imposed colour lines?

Who better to engage on the subject of hazardous liaisons than the students Jonathan Jansen served over seven years as Vice Chancellor of the University of the Free State.

The context is the University campus in Bloemfontein, the City of Roses, the Mississippi of South Africa. Rural, agricultural, insular, religious and conservative, this is not a place for breaking out.

But over the years, Jansen observed shifts in campus life and noticed more and more openly interracial friendships and couples, and he began having conversations with these students with burning questions in mind.

Ten interracial couples tell their stories of love and friendship in their own words, with no social theories imposed on their meanings, but instead a focus on how these students experience the world of interracial relationships, and how flawed, outdated laws and customs set limits on human relationships, and the long shadow they cast on learning, living and loving on university campuses to this day.
 

Jonathan Jansen is Distinguished Professor of Education at the University of Stellenbosch, after serving for many years as the Vice Chancellor of the University of the Free State. Jansen has a formidable reputation for transformation and a deep commitment to reconciliation in communities living with the heritage of apartheid. He holds an impressive collection of degrees and awards including the Education Africa Lifetime Achievement Award.

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The first low-carb lifestyle book that works equally well for men and women is finally available in SA!

Finally, available in South Africa!

The first low carb lifestyle book that works as well for women as it does for men and is supported by a Michelin starred chef, a doctor and a dietitian.

Heard the one about the Fat Professor, the Whole-Food Dietitian and the Michelin-trained Chef who want to change the world? Nope, this is not a silly joke. Far from it.

In fact, we hope this book provides some serious answers. We hope it is the beginning of a life-changing journey for many who have experienced inexplicable weight gain, the heartbreak of constant deprivation and yo-yo dieting, or worse, physical illness through poor nutrition.

For decades, the brightest minds in the nutrition and science field have had fat pegged as the bad guy.

As a result, many of us have been enslaved by an outdated food pyramid which has pushed us to eat carb-laden and processed food. As the evidence mounts against sugar and processed carbohydrates, it’s time to flip the pyramid and break free of the fat phobia.

In this practical guide, we present inspiring success stories, compelling evidence, and simple ways to “eat upside-down”.

Forget everything you were taught at school, flip the food pyramid on its head and start nourishing your body the way it was designed to be nourished.

“Prof Grant, Dietitian Caryn and Chef Craig are the leaders in the food revolution in New Zealand and Australia. I congratulate them on a job well done bringing the recipes, the practice, and the science together in one book. This is the complete how to guide for low-carbohydrate, healthy-fat living.” – Professor Tim Noakes, Emeritus Professor, University of Cape Town

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Jan Braai’s first crowd-sourced book – featuring YOUR favourite recipes – is here!


It doesn’t matter what you choose to call it, ultimately. Every South African understands what the significance of the braai is. This is where we come together to gossip, laugh, argue, debate and enjoy each other’s company. Long may it continue.
- Sipho Hlongwane

Mzansi loves to braai. In Shisanyama, Jan Braai asked South Africans to send him their best braai recipes, mixed them with some of his own favourites, made sure they were easy and really worked, and then put them in this book! So if you want to know what South Africans love to braai, and how they do it, this is the book for you.

Easy recipes, using readily available South African ingredients, Shisanyama is another Jan Braai classic following on from Fireworks, Red Hot and The Democratic Republic of Braai.

Who is Jan Braai?

His real name is Jan Scannell and he lives to braai. He started the National Braai Day initiative in 2005 and his aim is to create a national celebration of the one activity all South Africans have in common, regardless of race, language, gender or wealth: cooking over a fire.

His TV series Jan Braai for Erfenis has run each year on Kyknet since 2011, and his National Braai Tour is fast becoming a highlight of the annual braai calendar.

For more about Jan Braai visit www.braai.com or follow him on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram.

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Tie-in book to the film Vaya: Untold Stories of Johannesburg released

“This project represents hope and pride. I have endured and persevered to get here. My story matters.”
David Majoka – storyteller and writer

 

Vaya the film is based on the lives of four young men from the Homeless Writer’s Project: David Majoka, Anthony Mafela, Madoda Ntuli and Tshabalira Lebakeng, and rooted in their experiences of coming to Johannesburg. Vaya the book brings you the people and stories that inspired the award-winning film.

Through personal stories that are intimate and hard hitting, Vaya will both surprise and shock you. It offers a rare lens into life in Johannesburg and amplifies the voices of people who live on the city’s margins. The book will ignite conversations and debate about what the city means to millions of ordinary people who navigate its streets with courage and humanity.

Developed by the Homeless Writer’s Project, and containing accessible history, debates and interactive activities, here are the stories and people that inspired the award-winning film.

Vaya will both shock and inspire.

The Homeless Writer’s Project was started in 2010 by filmmaker Robbie Thorpe and joined soon after by Harriet Perlman. It gives a voice to the voiceless by creating opportunities for stories to be developed into films and published media. The group meets once a week to share stories and ideas and create a safe place for discussion. The film script for Vaya began in story workshops, where participants shared and told stories over a period of six years. These lived experiences were written down and crafted into a film script.

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“You can’t empower women without listening to their stories,” Gloria Steinem said. 200 Women listens.

“You can’t empower women without listening to their stories” – Gloria Steinem

 
 
200 Women Who Will Change the Way You See the World200 women from a variety of backgrounds are asked the same five questions. Their answers are inspiring human stories of success and courage, love and pain, redemption and generosity. From well-known activists, artists, and innovators to everyday women whose lives are no less exceptional for that, each woman shares her unique replies to questions like “What really matters to you?” and “What would you change in the world if you could?”

Interviewees include US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, actor and human rights activist Alfre Woodard, and Nobel laureate Jodi Williams, along with those who are making a difference behind the scenes around the world, such as Marion Wright Edelman, head of the Children’s Defense Fund.

Each interview is accompanied by a photographic portrait, resulting in a volume that is compelling in word and image – and global in its scope and resonance. This landmark book is published to coincide with an immersive travelling exhibition and an interactive website, building on this remarkable, ever-evolving project. With responses ranging from uplifting to heartbreaking, these women offer gifts of empowerment and strength inviting us to bring positive change at a time when so many are fighting for basic freedom and equality.

Local interviewees include Graça Machel, Caster Semenya, Zelda la Grange, Mpho Tutu van Furth, Hlubi Mboya, Sahm Venter, Joanne Fedler, Ingrid le Roux, Gillian Slovo and Zoleka Mandela, among others.

A minimum of 10% of the project’s revenue will be distributed to organisations devoted to protecting and advancing the rights of women. Each interviewee can nominate an organisation (or themselves if they are in financial need) to receive their portion of the charitable pool or they can select the principal charitable partner, the Graça Machel Trust.

Book details

  • 200 Women Who Will Change the Way You See the World by Ruth Hobday, edited by Kieran Scott, Geoff Blackwell, Sharon Gelman, Marianne Lassandro
    EAN: 978-1-928257-41-7
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

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Impress your guests with Jan Braai’s Red Wine Pears potjie recipe

The Democratic Republic of BraaiDie Demokratiese Republiek van BraaiJan Braai’s newest book, The Democratic Republic of Braai, was recently published by Bookstorm.

Jan is well known for his legendary braai desserts, and this mouthwatering recipe for Red Wine Pears is no exception.

Have a read, and impress your guests at your next potjie get-together:
 
 

The Democratic Republic of Braai by Jan Braai

 
Red Wine Pears

Fresh fruit is always welcome around the braai fire. Especially when it’s sweet, flavourful, comes with a red wine sauce and is served as dessert.

Make sure you use firm pears for playing this game as they will hold their shape better after cooking in the red wine. Always use the quality of wine you would also drink. If you were supposed to use something that tastes like vinegar, the name of the recipe would have been “Vinegar pears” but it isn’t.

Once done, you can also serve these pears with soft mascarpone cheese or ice cream instead of the blue cheese and pecan nuts, but then it is not going to look this cool in photos.

What you need
(feeds 6)

6 pears (firm but ripe)
1 packet pecan nuts (100 g, chopped roughly)
1 bottle good red wine
2 tots soft brown sugar
1 thick strip of orange peel
juice of that same orange
1 cinnamon stick
2 cloves (actual cloves, not garlic cloves)
1 star anise
1 block blue cheese (200 g, crumbled)

What to do

1. Peel the pears with a vegetable peeler, leaving the stalk still in place. The stalk makes absolutely no difference to how they taste but it does make them look cool.

2. Get your potjie on flames and dry-toast the pecan nuts for about 2 minutes until they start to smell like they want to be part of the meal but before they burn. Immediately remove them from the potjie before they do exactly that, and burn.

3. Place the wine, sugar, orange peel and juice, and all the spices into your now empty potjie, stir to mix, and bring the mixture to the boil.

4. Add the pears, put the lid on the potjie and let it simmer for 40 minutes until the pears are soft. Turn the pears often making sure they colour evenly all over. Once the pears are soft but still firm, remove from the potjie and set aside. It’s fine if they cool down partially or completely.

5. Bring the sauce to the boil again and reduce until it becomes more like a syrup. During this time, taste the sauce and if you want it sweeter, add a bit more brown sugar to it.

6. Serve the pears with crumbled blue cheese and a sprinkling of pecan nuts, and top it off with the wine reduction from the potjie.

 
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‘If Johannesburg works, South Africa works’ – Herman Mashaba outlines the DA’s plans for Joburg

Capitalist CrusaderBlack Like YouThe Democratic Alliance has shared an extract from the speech delivered by its mayoral candidate for Johannesburg, Herman Mashaba, at the launch of its electoral campaign for Johannesburg.

Mashaba announced that he was making himself available as DA mayoral candidate in December last year.

In the speech, Mashaba outlines the DA’s plans should they win Joburg in the local government elections, including “schools to skills” programmes for teenagers, early learning daycare centres in every township, cutting red tape for small businesses, and “strengthening the muscle” of the Johannesburg Metropolitan Police Department.

Mashaba is the founder of the Black Like Me hair care empire and the author of the memoir Black Like You and Capitalist Crusader: Fighting Poverty Through Economic Growth.

Read his speech:

Today we take the future of Joburg into our hands.

We are in Alexandra today, a place which represents the potential of Johannesburg, to show our determination to bring change to Johannesburg.

Let’s build a fair Johannesburg that we can all be proud to call home. Let’s create jobs for the millions of unemployed.

Let’s empower the many young black people who don’t experience the dignity of work.

Johannesburg is a great city. It is a melting pot of cultures. It’s the heartbeat of our nation. But Johannesburg can be even greater.

There was a time after 1994 when Johannesburg made progress towards redress.

There was improved housing delivery and essential services. There was development. There was economic growth.

Freedom meant that our city became one Jozi, a city that everyone called home.

But today that progress has stalled. Service delivery is no longer meeting people’s needs. Unemployment is unacceptably high.

Those close to government are getting rich, while everyone else is getting poorer.

We have stopped moving forward.

The current of corruption and bad governance is pulling us backwards.

That’s why I am standing as the DA’s change candidate. To make Johannesburg stand tall again.

I’ve entered the race of my life because I love this City and because I’ve seen how opportunity changes lives. It is deeply personal.

I know that opportunity is the difference between hope and fear, life and death.

My story, like many of your stories, challenges those who seek to use race to divide us.

Like millions of black South Africans, I grew up in poverty during apartheid. I grew up in GaRamotse in Hammanskraal and I was raised by my sisters while our mother worked long hours as a domestic worker.

Mmusi Maimane and I went back there last Monday, and I saw how too little has changed.

The difficulty of life back then, in so many ways still exists today in places like Soweto, Alex, Orange Farm, Kaya Sand, and Zandspruit.

This is not yet a fair society.

And this is why I work for change in Johannesburg.

In my twenties, I set up a company called Black Like Me with a white partner. A man I could proudly call a friend.

I have always believed that black and white South Africans journeys are bound together.

We share unbreakable bonds of humanity and goodness. We share one destiny. We stand or fall together.

The dream of a non-racial South Africa gives life. Despite the storms that threaten to overwhelm us, the dream lives on. The dream will never die.

This dream motivates me every day.

I’ve not found hatred or bitterness on the campaign. I’ve found courage, warmth, and kindness in the midst of unspeakable difficulties.

I’ve been changed by what I’ve experienced.

I’ve seen poor and old grandmothers dig their own toilet pits.

I’ve been stung by the despair of young black men in townships without jobs or an education.

I’ve felt the hopelessness of young people, most of whom are black, trapped in long-term unemployment.

I’ve winced as young mothers queue to pump water for their families into buckets.

I’ve felt the frustration of small business entrepreneurs, many of whom are black, who have no support to prosper.

This stirs us to action.

This new DA city government will redress past injustices. Redress means to “make right” with our brothers and sisters, with a dynamic economy.

Ending the divide between “insiders” and “outsiders” will turn South Africa around.

Our vision is to create hundreds of thousands of jobs in the City of Gold over the next five years. We will attract investment by being an open, transparent, clean, well-governed city that is open to business.

For if Johannesburg works, South Africa works.

We’ll get Johannesburg working by helping small businesses. We’ll cut the red tape that strangles entrepreneurs. We’ll cut up the old by-laws that obstruct business growth, in our first days in office. After 100 days they’ll be removed or amended.

We’ll audit City-owned land and buildings to set free the people’s assets. We’ll identify affordable commercial spaces for small businesses, artisans, and shops, and we’ll make them available at the most affordable annual rental possible.

We’ll connect people to training opportunities and internships. We’ll help them to find jobs in these new businesses.

I know how business works, with a 30-year track record of creating thousands of jobs. Job creation is in my public service DNA.

The DA will connect aspirant entrepreneurs to start-up loans.

We’ll carve up large tenders into small contracts. Many more small businesses can then bid for them successfully. And we’ll open up the tender system entirely, so everyone can see how they are awarded.

We’ll cut out all of the unnecessary consultants, to save millions for service delivery.

We’ll partner large, sector-focused companies with smaller businesses that want to grow. These will be business growth mentoring programmes through the City.

We cannot stop thinking about the future. The “Internet of Everything” will determine the future of successful cities.

We’ll develop a customised network by 2021 and we’ll centralise City data to improve service delivery, from repairing potholes to saving energy.

City and state trade missions to South Africa will bring investment to a new Jozi that is open, accessible, and transparent.

We will lead a revolution in the service levels of public servants and unveil a ‘Service with Pride’ vision on day one.

Courtesy and swiftly answered telephones will become the new norm. We’ll award exceptional performance for raising the City’s profile.

We’ll introduce an Executive Projects Dashboard for real-time monitoring of every project around the city. No project will just stop half-way and go unfinished.

The poorest residents of Joburg suffer the most from corruption. Corruption steals our public money, and it kills jobs.

When we take office, we will make corruption public enemy number one.

Criminals will be handed over to the police.

The DA will strengthen and bolster the Integrity and Internal Investigations Unit in the JMPD. Through the Mayor and open committee meetings, the unit will be directly accountable to the people. Criminal charges against corrupt officers will be pursued.

We also know that crime and drugs are wrecking people’s lives.

The DA-led City will strengthen the muscle of the JMPD.

Safety and security data will be centralised. This will improve local policing and identify drug lords and gangs.

The best technology will be used. Patterns will be spotted before crime is committed.

The police will be protected with body and vehicle dashboard cameras, and a fleet of ghost cars.

Our JMPD will be protectors of each and every one of us.

For if Johannesburg works, South Africa works.

The DA will introduce “schools to skills” programmes for teenagers to navigate one of life’s toughest journeys, which will prepare young people for the modern workplace through skills training right out of school.

The DA will work with the private sector to drive two new special projects. We’ll establish early learning day care centres in every township, where our children will receive love, nutritious meals, and a basic pre-school education.

We’ll identify city-owned properties for entrepreneurs who will transform them into top performing schools and technical colleges for our poorest residents.

We know that a home is more than just where we raise family, it is our economic security. We cannot get Johannesburg working until we fix the housing crisis.

We’ll do four major things to turnaround Johannesburg’s housing crisis:

We’ll fast-track ownership by giving thousands of people title deeds. The poor will come first.

We’ll do everything possible to stop housing list corruption. The process will be transparent and open. The list will be available for anyone to see.

We’ll incentivise entrepreneurs who build green-friendly homes.

We’ll provide basic services to informal settlements, with the best free allocations in South Africa, to the poorest residents.

The DA does this in other cities where we govern, and now we want to do this in Johannesburg.

Affordable and safe public transport goes hand in hand with housing. The poorest of our residents will have easy access to quality public transport.

No more will Soweto residents pay up to half of their money each month just to get transport into the City.

We will integrate the divergent bus services, and we will bring about a single ticket system so that our residents can travel seamlessly. And we’ll promote rapid transit, adaptive parking, bike-sharing, and walking paths.

We’ll work with the private sector to build sporting facilities. I want to see new soccer turfs in every community where young soccer talent is currently lost on dusty sand pitches.

We’ll have properly resourced and staffed clinics. We’ll employ caring nurses, and we’ll fill vacancies so that people don’t spend hours and days queuing for medical help.

For if Johannesburg works, South Africa works.

The time has come to put the government to work.

These are not pipe-dreams, but tried and tested promises, from where the DA governs already.

The best story to tell in South Africa, is how life gets better and better under the DA.

It’s the story of how unemployment is lowest, where the DA governs.

It’s the story of how services are delivered at the highest levels in South Africa, where the DA governs.

It’s the story of how we spend every cent of public money for the good of the people, where the DA governs.

The time has come to elect a DA government that brings this change to Johannesburg.

The time has come to elect a DA government that works for the people.

These are not empty words.

We stand on the shoulders of DA councillors who have already changed South Africa.

And let me say this: If I do not deliver on these promises after being elected, vote us out. It is that simple.

There is nothing broken in Johannesburg that cannot be fixed by Johannesburg. Johannesburg has all the right ingredients to be a great City.

The potential to greatness is in the residents of the City.

The current government talks big but acts small. But there is no glory in acting small.

Greatness does not happen by chance. It takes hard work, guts, and determination.

The DA government will create jobs and deliver quality services to every resident.

We will deliver a Fair Johannesburg, where Freedom is tangible, and where Opportunity abounds.

So far, this campaign journey has taken me from door to door, street to street, township to township.

The journey has taken me to meet people of character, of goodness, of decency.

The journey has brought me to this point. I am now asking every resident of Johannesburg to come on board and join me on this great journey: A journey to a prosperous and fair Johannesburg.

Your votes will elect a DA government that creates jobs and provides services.

That destiny rests in all of our hands.

For this is true: If Johannesburg works, South Africa works.

 
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Win a copy of Death By Carbs by Paige Nick: Undeniably brilliant satire

Tim Noakes and Paige Nick

 
Death By CarbsDeath By Carbs, Paige Nick’s rip-roaring satire of the so-called “Banting revolution”, has been incredibly well received.

In a review for Women24, Marisa Crous writes: “Nick is my kind of author: undeniably brilliant at writing satire.” Avis Perks writes in a review for The Cape Argus: “Whether you’re a Tim Noakes fan or not, or even a mere bemused bystander, all you need is a healthy appetite for humour to enjoy this irreverent take on our weird and wonderful society.”

If you want to get your hands on a copy, you can follow traditional methods like ordering online or visiting your local bookshop. If you are in Cape Town, you could contact the author directly on her Facebook page and get your own personalised copy:

If you live in Cape Town and you’d like a personalised copy of Death By Carbs delivered to your door for just R150, let me know, I’ve got a boot full of books, and I’m not afraid to use them.

Or, you could enter Women24‘s competition, which closes 15 February, to stand a chance of winning one of two copies:

Want to win a copy of this book? Simply send us an e-mail to chatback@women24.com and tell us about your favourite mystery novel.

Women24 review:

Sunday Times columnist Paige Nick has written a delightful novel which pokes fun at this entire phenomenon. Death by Carbs is a refreshingly witty read with an exceptionally written bunch of characters. They represent all possible affected parties of this diet craze: the fans, the internet trolls and those most likely to benefit from the death of Noakes himself.

Cape Argus review:

 
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Proteas and Cricket South Africa support Gift of the Givers’s drought relief campaign

Imtiaz Sooliman and the Gift of the GiversThe Gift of the Givers has been taking its motto – “Best among people are those who benefit mankind” – to heart by extending a helping hand to the thousands upon thousands of South Africans suffering because of the ongoing drought in the country.

Linking up with various big organisations, Gift of the Givers is in the process of distributing water, hygiene packs and food as well as animal feed to areas in need.

In a press release on its website, the organisation reports on the support given to them by the Proteas and Cricket South Africa:

Gift of the Givers Drought Relief Campaign has been expanding exponentially drawing interest and support from diverse sections of the South African public. Today we have an interesting new partner. The Proteas and Cricket South Africa have expressed a willingness to support the campaign encouraging all supporters arriving at Mangaung Oval in Bloemfontein for today’s first ODI between England and South Africa to bring a 5 litre bottle of water. At some point predetermined by CSA select members of the Proteas team will do a symbolic handover of 5 litre bottled water at our vehicles which will be stationed at Gate 3. Those who have not managed to purchase water can sponsor R10 per 5 litre bottle at the trucks. Contributions are welcome for animal feed as we commence distribution of water and animal feed to small farmers in an attempt to save their animals and farms. We have been busy with extensive drought relief programmes in the Free State.

Gift of the Givers has also shared photos of the handover on Twitter:

 
A detailed report back on the extent of the Gift of the Givers’s drought intervention in several provinces in South Africa will be presented on its website soon.

For more on this disaster relief organisation read Imtiaz Sooliman and the Gift of the Givers: A Mercy to All by Shafiq Morton.
 
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Something for everyone: The new Sunday Times Food Weekly Cookbook

Food Weekly Cookbook 4Don’t miss the new Sunday Times Food Weekly Cookbook 4:

The Sunday Times brings you a bumper helping of the Food Weekly Cookbook – the fourth edition following on the very successful first three editions.

There’s nothing quite like a homemade meal. The Sunday Times Food Weekly Cookbook offers a wide selection of easy recipes to choose from – and there’s something for everyone. From everyday suppers to family gatherings and easy entertaining, there’s a feast of ideas here.

And for those with a sweet tooth, cakes and desserts galore …

About the author

Hilary Biller has been writing about food for more than 25 years and has a flair for making food accessible in the tastiest ways possible. Hilary has held the position of editor of the Sunday Times Food Weekly supplement since 2008, and has written nine cookery books to date.

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