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Archive for the ‘News’ Category

A School Where I Belong reflects on transformation and belonging in South African schools

Over the past few years, it has become clear that the path of transformation in schools since 1994 has not led South Africa’s education system to where we had hoped it could be.

Through tweets, posts and recent protests in schools, it has become apparent that in former Model-C and private schools, children of colour and those who are ‘different’ don’t feel they belong.

Following the astonishing success of How to Fix South Africa’s Schools, the authors sat down with young people who attended former Model-C and private schools, as well as principals and teachers, to reflect on transformation and belonging in South African schools. These filmed reflections, included on DVD in this book, are honest and insightful.

Drawing on the authors’ experiences in supporting schools over the last twenty years, and the insight of those interviewed, A School Where I Belong outlines six areas where true transformation in South African classrooms and schools can begin.

THE AUTHORS
Dylan Wray is co-founder and director of Shikaya – a non-profit that supports teachers and school leaders to ensure young people leave school thinking critically, and being compassionate, engaged, democratic citizens. Wray has worked globally as a teacher, facilitator, materials developer and author, and is co-founder of FutureProof Schools.

Roy Hellenberg has served on senior management teams of two top traditional boys’ schools in South Africa. Hellenberg has special interest and expertise in education in post-conflict societies, and has worked with Shikaya and FHAO over the past 11 years in equipping teachers to develop inclusive classrooms that encourage critical thinking and democratic practice. Hellenberg is also a co-founder of FutureProof Schools.

Jonathan Jansen is Distinguished Professor of Education at the University of Stellenbosch, and served for many years as Vice Chancellor of the University of the Free State. Jansen has a formidable reputation for transformation and for a deep commitment to reconciliation in communities living with the heritage of apartheid. He holds an impressive collection of degrees and awards including the Education Africa Lifetime Achievement Award.

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Win a copy of Stuart Doran’s Kingdom, Power, Glory

The early years of Zimbabwe’s independence were blighted by conflict and bloodshed, culminating in the Gukurahundi massacres of 1983 and 1984. Historian Stuart Doran explores these events in unprecedented detail, drawing on thousands of previously unpublished documents, including classified records from Mugabe’s Central Intelligence Organisation, apartheid South Africa, the UK, USA, Australia and Canada.

This groundbreaking book charts the development of an intense rivalry between two nationalist parties – Mugabe’s Zanu and Nkomo’s Zapu – and reveals how Zanu’s victory in the 1980 elections was followed by a carefully orchestrated five-year plan, driven by Mugabe, which sought to smash all forms of political opposition and impose a one-party state. Doran shows not only what happened during Zimbabwe’s darkest chapter, but also why this cataclysm occurred. In an expansive narrative saturated with new findings, he documents a culture of political intolerance in which domination and subjugation became the only options, and traces the rise of key proponents of this supremacist ideology.

Kingdom, Power, Glory is the most comprehensive history of Zimbabwe’s formative years and is essential reading for anyone hoping to understand the Mugabe regime, then and now.

Click here for the entry details and stand a chance to win this singular book, shortlisted for the 2018 Alan Paton Award for non-fiction.

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Remember Winnie Madikizela-Mandela (26 September 1936 – 2 April 2018). Watch her discuss gender equality, the joy of grandchildren, and dismantling patriarchal systems

In 200 Women Who Will Change the Way You See the World, 200 women from a variety of backgrounds are asked the same five questions. Their answers are inspiring human stories of success and courage, love and pain, redemption and generosity. From well-known activists, artists, and innovators to everyday women whose lives are no less exceptional for that, each woman shares her unique replies to questions like “What really matters to you?” and “What would you change in the world if you could?”

Interviewees include US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, actor and human rights activist Alfre Woodard, and Nobel laureate Jodi Williams, along with those who are making a difference behind the scenes around the world, such as Marion Wright Edelman, head of the Children’s Defense Fund.

Each interview is accompanied by a photographic portrait, resulting in a volume that is compelling in word and image – and global in its scope and resonance. This landmark book is published to coincide with an immersive travelling exhibition and an interactive website, building on this remarkable, ever-evolving project. With responses ranging from uplifting to heartbreaking, these women offer gifts of empowerment and strength inviting us to bring positive change at a time when so many are fighting for basic freedom and equality.

Local interviewees include Graça Machel, Caster Semenya, Zelda la Grange, Mpho Tutu van Furth, Hlubi Mboya, Sahm Venter, Joanne Fedler, Ingrid le Roux, Gillian Slovo and Zoleka Mandela, among others.

A minimum of 10% of the project’s revenue will be distributed to organisations devoted to protecting and advancing the rights of women. Each interviewee can nominate an organisation (or themselves if they are in financial need) to receive their portion of the charitable pool or they can select the principal charitable partner, the Graça Machel Trust.

In light of the passing of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela (26 September 1936 – 2 April 2018), let her sage words on gender equality, the joy of grandchildren, and dismantling patriarchal systems serve as a reminder of her contribution to South Africa’s history:

200 Women Who Will Change the Way You See the World

Book details

  • 200 Women Who Will Change the Way You See the World by Ruth Hobday, edited by Kieran Scott, Geoff Blackwell, Sharon Gelman, Marianne Lassandro
    EAN: 978-1-928257-41-7
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

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Read all about the women behind the Marigold co-operative


Beaders from left, Concilia Mukarobwa, Dzidzai Shemaiah Hwende, Siphiwe Dube, Similo Moyo and Thokozile Maseko. Image © Liz Whitter.
 
Making Marigold: Beaders of Bulawayo is a portrait of a women’s beading co-operative specialising in loomed beadwork, based in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.

Over 200 photographs reveal the sumptuous glamour of the Marigold beadwork and necklaces. Short, stand-alone narrative vignettes offer background insights into the making and development of the Marigold co-operative.

How did these women, whose skilled practice and creative impulses evident in every necklace, perfect this practice?

And what has sustained their efforts across the decades?

Joni Brenner is an artist who revisits the same subject – whether live model or skull – over and again, a practice that informs her understanding of learning through doing, looking closely and recognising shifts.

Her belief in the value of repetition underpins her fascination, and her collaboration, with the Marigold beading co-operative.

She is a Principal Tutor in History of Art at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.

Elizabeth Burroughs is a researcher and writer whose interests include the role of languages in culture and identity, the nature of consciousness, and the processes of making.

She has worked primarily in the field of education, lecturing in English Literature and Linguistics, and as senior manager for Umalusi, the quality council for schools and college education in South Africa.

She now works as a freelance consultant and writer.

Times LIVE recently published a piece on the remarkable women behind the Marigold co-op:

In 2011, Johannesburg artist Joni Brenner saw a strip of loomed beadwork made in Bulawayo, draped it around her neck and asked if it could be joined to make a necklace.

When she wore her commissioned necklaces to the 2011 FNB JoburgArtFair, many people admired them and requested their own.

The necklaces were made by the Marigold co-operative, which specialises in loomed beadwork. The co-op was established in 1992 with about 20 women, most of whom had belonged to groups known as “School Leavers’ Clubs” where crafts and entrepreneurship skills were taught to young people who were unable, for various reasons, to complete their schooling.

In Marigold’s first decade or so, clients and commissions were plentiful. But Marigold’s fortunes, mirroring Zimbabwe’s waning economy and complicated political history, declined as resources and clients gradually ceased to be steadily available. People drifted away from Marigold in search of other employment.

However, three women – Siphiwe Dube, Sifiso Mathe and Teresa Nkomo, founder members of Marigold – managed through sheer persistence to save their co-operative.

Continue reading here.

Making Marigold

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“Can racism and intimacy co-exist in post-apartheid South Africa?” asks Jonathan Jansen in Making Love in a War Zone

‘My father-in-law did not show up for the wedding. My future wife had to leave her family home the moment we asked permission to ‘go out’ together, a tradition in those days. There were certain members of the family whom she visited on her own; my presence was not welcomed. I was a confident human being and a proud black man, but those things stick when it comes to flesh and blood.’

– Jonathan Jansen

Making Love in a War Zone

Can racism and intimacy co-exist? Can love and friendship form and flourish across South Africa’s imposed colour lines?

Who better to engage on the subject of hazardous liaisons than the students Jonathan Jansen served over seven years as Vice Chancellor of the University of the Free State.

The context is the University campus in Bloemfontein, the City of Roses, the Mississippi of South Africa. Rural, agricultural, insular, religious and conservative, this is not a place for breaking out.

But over the years, Jansen observed shifts in campus life and noticed more and more openly interracial friendships and couples, and he began having conversations with these students with burning questions in mind.

Ten interracial couples tell their stories of love and friendship in their own words, with no social theories imposed on their meanings, but instead a focus on how these students experience the world of interracial relationships, and how flawed, outdated laws and customs set limits on human relationships, and the long shadow they cast on learning, living and loving on university campuses to this day.
 

Jonathan Jansen is Distinguished Professor of Education at the University of Stellenbosch, after serving for many years as the Vice Chancellor of the University of the Free State. Jansen has a formidable reputation for transformation and a deep commitment to reconciliation in communities living with the heritage of apartheid. He holds an impressive collection of degrees and awards including the Education Africa Lifetime Achievement Award.

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The first low-carb lifestyle book that works equally well for men and women is finally available in SA!

Finally, available in South Africa!

The first low carb lifestyle book that works as well for women as it does for men and is supported by a Michelin starred chef, a doctor and a dietitian.

Heard the one about the Fat Professor, the Whole-Food Dietitian and the Michelin-trained Chef who want to change the world? Nope, this is not a silly joke. Far from it.

In fact, we hope this book provides some serious answers. We hope it is the beginning of a life-changing journey for many who have experienced inexplicable weight gain, the heartbreak of constant deprivation and yo-yo dieting, or worse, physical illness through poor nutrition.

For decades, the brightest minds in the nutrition and science field have had fat pegged as the bad guy.

As a result, many of us have been enslaved by an outdated food pyramid which has pushed us to eat carb-laden and processed food. As the evidence mounts against sugar and processed carbohydrates, it’s time to flip the pyramid and break free of the fat phobia.

In this practical guide, we present inspiring success stories, compelling evidence, and simple ways to “eat upside-down”.

Forget everything you were taught at school, flip the food pyramid on its head and start nourishing your body the way it was designed to be nourished.

“Prof Grant, Dietitian Caryn and Chef Craig are the leaders in the food revolution in New Zealand and Australia. I congratulate them on a job well done bringing the recipes, the practice, and the science together in one book. This is the complete how to guide for low-carbohydrate, healthy-fat living.” – Professor Tim Noakes, Emeritus Professor, University of Cape Town

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Jan Braai’s first crowd-sourced book – featuring YOUR favourite recipes – is here!


It doesn’t matter what you choose to call it, ultimately. Every South African understands what the significance of the braai is. This is where we come together to gossip, laugh, argue, debate and enjoy each other’s company. Long may it continue.
- Sipho Hlongwane

Mzansi loves to braai. In Shisanyama, Jan Braai asked South Africans to send him their best braai recipes, mixed them with some of his own favourites, made sure they were easy and really worked, and then put them in this book! So if you want to know what South Africans love to braai, and how they do it, this is the book for you.

Easy recipes, using readily available South African ingredients, Shisanyama is another Jan Braai classic following on from Fireworks, Red Hot and The Democratic Republic of Braai.

Who is Jan Braai?

His real name is Jan Scannell and he lives to braai. He started the National Braai Day initiative in 2005 and his aim is to create a national celebration of the one activity all South Africans have in common, regardless of race, language, gender or wealth: cooking over a fire.

His TV series Jan Braai for Erfenis has run each year on Kyknet since 2011, and his National Braai Tour is fast becoming a highlight of the annual braai calendar.

For more about Jan Braai visit www.braai.com or follow him on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram.

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Tie-in book to the film Vaya: Untold Stories of Johannesburg released

“This project represents hope and pride. I have endured and persevered to get here. My story matters.”
David Majoka – storyteller and writer

 

Vaya the film is based on the lives of four young men from the Homeless Writer’s Project: David Majoka, Anthony Mafela, Madoda Ntuli and Tshabalira Lebakeng, and rooted in their experiences of coming to Johannesburg. Vaya the book brings you the people and stories that inspired the award-winning film.

Through personal stories that are intimate and hard hitting, Vaya will both surprise and shock you. It offers a rare lens into life in Johannesburg and amplifies the voices of people who live on the city’s margins. The book will ignite conversations and debate about what the city means to millions of ordinary people who navigate its streets with courage and humanity.

Developed by the Homeless Writer’s Project, and containing accessible history, debates and interactive activities, here are the stories and people that inspired the award-winning film.

Vaya will both shock and inspire.

The Homeless Writer’s Project was started in 2010 by filmmaker Robbie Thorpe and joined soon after by Harriet Perlman. It gives a voice to the voiceless by creating opportunities for stories to be developed into films and published media. The group meets once a week to share stories and ideas and create a safe place for discussion. The film script for Vaya began in story workshops, where participants shared and told stories over a period of six years. These lived experiences were written down and crafted into a film script.

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“You can’t empower women without listening to their stories,” Gloria Steinem said. 200 Women listens.

“You can’t empower women without listening to their stories” – Gloria Steinem

 
 
200 Women Who Will Change the Way You See the World200 women from a variety of backgrounds are asked the same five questions. Their answers are inspiring human stories of success and courage, love and pain, redemption and generosity. From well-known activists, artists, and innovators to everyday women whose lives are no less exceptional for that, each woman shares her unique replies to questions like “What really matters to you?” and “What would you change in the world if you could?”

Interviewees include US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, actor and human rights activist Alfre Woodard, and Nobel laureate Jodi Williams, along with those who are making a difference behind the scenes around the world, such as Marion Wright Edelman, head of the Children’s Defense Fund.

Each interview is accompanied by a photographic portrait, resulting in a volume that is compelling in word and image – and global in its scope and resonance. This landmark book is published to coincide with an immersive travelling exhibition and an interactive website, building on this remarkable, ever-evolving project. With responses ranging from uplifting to heartbreaking, these women offer gifts of empowerment and strength inviting us to bring positive change at a time when so many are fighting for basic freedom and equality.

Local interviewees include Graça Machel, Caster Semenya, Zelda la Grange, Mpho Tutu van Furth, Hlubi Mboya, Sahm Venter, Joanne Fedler, Ingrid le Roux, Gillian Slovo and Zoleka Mandela, among others.

A minimum of 10% of the project’s revenue will be distributed to organisations devoted to protecting and advancing the rights of women. Each interviewee can nominate an organisation (or themselves if they are in financial need) to receive their portion of the charitable pool or they can select the principal charitable partner, the Graça Machel Trust.

Book details

  • 200 Women Who Will Change the Way You See the World by Ruth Hobday, edited by Kieran Scott, Geoff Blackwell, Sharon Gelman, Marianne Lassandro
    EAN: 978-1-928257-41-7
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

» read article

Impress your guests with Jan Braai’s Red Wine Pears potjie recipe

The Democratic Republic of BraaiDie Demokratiese Republiek van BraaiJan Braai’s newest book, The Democratic Republic of Braai, was recently published by Bookstorm.

Jan is well known for his legendary braai desserts, and this mouthwatering recipe for Red Wine Pears is no exception.

Have a read, and impress your guests at your next potjie get-together:
 
 

The Democratic Republic of Braai by Jan Braai

 
Red Wine Pears

Fresh fruit is always welcome around the braai fire. Especially when it’s sweet, flavourful, comes with a red wine sauce and is served as dessert.

Make sure you use firm pears for playing this game as they will hold their shape better after cooking in the red wine. Always use the quality of wine you would also drink. If you were supposed to use something that tastes like vinegar, the name of the recipe would have been “Vinegar pears” but it isn’t.

Once done, you can also serve these pears with soft mascarpone cheese or ice cream instead of the blue cheese and pecan nuts, but then it is not going to look this cool in photos.

What you need
(feeds 6)

6 pears (firm but ripe)
1 packet pecan nuts (100 g, chopped roughly)
1 bottle good red wine
2 tots soft brown sugar
1 thick strip of orange peel
juice of that same orange
1 cinnamon stick
2 cloves (actual cloves, not garlic cloves)
1 star anise
1 block blue cheese (200 g, crumbled)

What to do

1. Peel the pears with a vegetable peeler, leaving the stalk still in place. The stalk makes absolutely no difference to how they taste but it does make them look cool.

2. Get your potjie on flames and dry-toast the pecan nuts for about 2 minutes until they start to smell like they want to be part of the meal but before they burn. Immediately remove them from the potjie before they do exactly that, and burn.

3. Place the wine, sugar, orange peel and juice, and all the spices into your now empty potjie, stir to mix, and bring the mixture to the boil.

4. Add the pears, put the lid on the potjie and let it simmer for 40 minutes until the pears are soft. Turn the pears often making sure they colour evenly all over. Once the pears are soft but still firm, remove from the potjie and set aside. It’s fine if they cool down partially or completely.

5. Bring the sauce to the boil again and reduce until it becomes more like a syrup. During this time, taste the sauce and if you want it sweeter, add a bit more brown sugar to it.

6. Serve the pears with crumbled blue cheese and a sprinkling of pecan nuts, and top it off with the wine reduction from the potjie.

 
Related stories:

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